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In his first New York marathon, Tamirat Tola sets a course record.

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Scott Cacciola
Hellen Obiri of Kenya outsprinted Letesenbet Gidey and Sharon Lokedi at the finish.Credit…Amir Hamja/The New York Times

Hellen Obiri of Kenya won the elite women’s race, outsprinting Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia, and Tamirat Tola of Ethiopia won the men’s.

Obiri finished in an unofficial time of 2:27:23. Tola finished in an unofficial time of 2:04:59, a course record.

The wheelchair races delivered the first results — both record-making — earlier on Sunday. Catherine Debrunner of Switzerland easily won her first New York marathon in a time of 1:39:32, a course record. And Marcel Hug, also of Switzerland, won his third straight men’s race in an unofficial time of 1:25:28. It was his sixth overall New York victory, a new record, surpassing the five wins of Kurt Fearnley.

Some 50,000 athletes are competing under clear skies and unseasonably warm temperatures, and many more people have lined the race course across all five boroughs to cheer them on.

Marathon Day is something of an unofficial holiday for New York City, as people come out with costumes, cow bells, live music and pun-filled signs to support the runners.

Last year, 47,839 marathoners from 131 countries finished the race. Their average time across the finish line in Central Park was 4 hours 50 minutes 26 seconds.

You can read our earlier coverage of the marathon here, including this full guide.

Erin Nolan

Nov. 5, 2023, 2:00 p.m. ET

Erin Nolan

It’s been three years since Elaine Cheung first dressed up as a banana at the New York marathon to ensure her friend who was running would see her cheering from the sidelines a little more than half a mile from the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge.

“It turns out that when you wear a big banana, people start asking you for bananas,” said Ms. Cheung, 35.

She now dons the bright yellow costume and hands out bananas to passing runners every year.

Credit…Erin Nolan for The New York Times
Lola Fadulu

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:59 p.m. ET

Lola Fadulu

It looks like the final group of marathoners are passing through 4th Avenue and Flatbush Avenue on Mile 8. Whitney Houston’s “I Wanna Dance With Somebody” blared from the nearby stage.

Route of the New York City Marathon

Halfway

Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:57 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

Corey Crouch, of Charlottesville, Va., had a big goal coming into today’s race: a 2:50 finish. But coming off the Queensboro Bridge, his right hip flexor seized up. He fell at one point, and his pace went from 6:30 per mile to 11 minutes over the last 10 miles. He finished in 3:25.

He expects to be out for four to six weeks because of his injury, but he’s not soured on the distance or the course.

“I’m coming back for my revenge,” he said. “It’s going to happen.”

Credit…Jennie Coughlin for The New York Times
Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:56 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

Broadway near Lincoln Center is blocked off to cars, but not pedicabs. With thousands of tired runners exiting, the pedicabs are lined up ready to cart runners to their destination.

Credit…Jennie Coughlin for The New York Times
Lola Fadulu

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:46 p.m. ET

Lola Fadulu

It’s pretty warm now, in the mid 60s, and many of the marathoners approaching Mile 8 have taken off sweatshirts and jackets and tied them around their waists.

Corey Kilgannon

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:44 p.m. ET

Corey Kilgannon

At 97th Street and Fifth Avenue in Manhattan, a running club called Run & Chug is handing out free cups of light beer to runners. The club meets Wednesday evenings to run four miles, and then drink in a bar afterward. They have a few members in the race, but the beer is for anyone who wants it.

One member, Jessica Wilks, said that the group has gotten shut down in the past by the police, but not this year.

She said it helps perk up runners at this late stage in the race, even if they don’t take the beer.

“We hand out light beer,” she said. “We’re not giving away IPAs here.”

Credit…Corey Kilgannon/The New York Times
Claire Fahy

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:36 p.m. ET

Claire Fahy

Gabriella and Emily Tedesco wanted to make sure their sister, Annie, could see them cheering for her in the crowd. So, they dressed up as chickens.

“We needed to stand out for her,” Emily Tedesco said.

Annie wasn’t the only beneficiary. The costumes gave the runners making their way through Harlem a laugh. Some made time for a hug or a high five.

Credit…Claire Fahy for The New York Times
Lola Fadulu

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:32 p.m. ET

Lola Fadulu

Once crowded, the area near Mile 8 at 4th Avenue and Flatbush Avenue is starting to thin out. A greater number of the marathoners coming through this portion of the race are walking, and there are fewer of them on the course.

Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:31 p.m. ET
Each year, The New York Times works to print the names of as many marathon finishers as possible.

As some marathoners finish the race, The New York Times is competing in its own race, one to get as many of the finishers’ names and times as possible into Monday’s city edition of the paper.

The list, known as the marathon agate, is a popular memento for runners, and the edition that carries it sees a bump in newsstand sales of almost 50 percent compared with a typical Monday paper.

“Agate” is a newspaper term for information, like sports scores ad stock market listings, that is printed in smaller type.

In this case, the type is just a quarter-inch high, helpful when the goal is to get as many of the 50,000 runners’ names in the paper as time and space allow.

Read more about the tradition here.

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:31 p.m. ET

Maureen Cavanagh

Aaron Judge, the New York Yankees right fielder, was at the finish line to congratulate his wife, Samantha Bracksieck Judge, after she finished the race.

Credit…Elsa/Getty Images
Erin Nolan

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:23 p.m. ET

Erin Nolan

Alicia Shepherd, 44, and her friends waved their arms, blew whistles and honked bicycle horns as they cheered for runners on 44th Drive in Queens. They knew several of the runners, but it didn’t matter who was passing them — their enthusiasm was unchanged.

“We’re all runners and athletes ourselves, so if we’re not running, were celebrating,” Shepherd said. “It’s so good for the morale of everyone in the city.”

Credit…Erin Nolan for The New York Times
Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:19 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

On race day, many runners really appreciate the poncho waiting at the finish line. As runners exit the finish area zone onto Broadway, there are orange ponchos everywhere.

Credit…Jennie Coughlin for The New York Times
Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:13 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

The finishers who I’ve talked to so far have all come in under three hours, but there are thousands more to come and many who will take twice that time to complete the race. The finish line will stay up well into the evening, and Project Finish and other groups will show up to celebrate the final finishers, who are generally still in Brooklyn now.

Claire Fahy

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:12 p.m. ET

Claire Fahy

One of the many charities gathered on First Avenue is Sandy Hook Promise, a group formed after the Connecticut school shooting that aims to protect children from gun violence. The group had 44 runners competing in today’s marathon.

“It’s so powerful, so emotional,” said Mark Barden, the group’s founder, whose son, Daniel, died in the shooting. “For people to make this kind of an effort to support Sandy Hook Promise, it’s so important.”

Credit…Claire Fahy for The New York Times
Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:08 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

Kai Bohannon, 24, traveled from California to run her first marathon today.

“It was awesome, it was so much fun, but I’m feeling it,” she said after she had swapped her running sneakers for sandals.

Bohannon met up with her boyfriend, Omid Mogasemi, 22, then found a bench across from Lincoln Center to sit down.

Mogasemi saw her at Mile 8 and Mile 24, but missed her at Mile 17 because she got there before his train did. He said it was great how easy it was to follow her around the course.

Credit…Jennie Coughlin for The New York Times
Lola Fadulu

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:03 p.m. ET

Lola Fadulu

Protesters have started chanting “Free Palestine.” “What’s that got to do with the marathon?” a woman yelled in response.

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CreditCredit…Lola Fadulu for The New York Times
Lola Fadulu

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:19 p.m. ET

Lola Fadulu

Some runners are engaging with the protesters. Some are stopping to high-five, fist pump and record the people holding “Free Palestine” signs. One man gave the group a thumbs down. Across the way, a woman applauded a group waving Israeli flags.

Lola Fadulu

Nov. 5, 2023, 1:03 p.m. ET

Lola Fadulu

People have protested largely peacefully against the Israel-Hamas war. A man waved the Israeli flag mere feet away from a group of people waving the flag of Palestine and “Free Palestine” signs. Across the way, more people raised cardboard signs that read “Queers 4 Palestine!”

Credit…Lola Fadulu for The New York Times
Credit…Hiroko Masuike/The New York Times
Callie Holtermann

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:59 p.m. ET
Runners make their way through Bay Ridge in Brooklyn.Credit…Amr Alfiky for The New York Times

Show up at the New York City Marathon, and you’ll be on a first-name basis with many of its runners.

Each year, hundreds of participants introduce themselves in large block letters on their singlets. The shirts function as giant name tags, allowing members of the crowd to call out personalized cheers of encouragement — or frank feedback.

“Pick up the pace, Timmy!” Tim Carvin once heard a stranger yell as he turned onto First Avenue in Manhattan. He did his best to oblige.

Mr. Carvin, 41, who lives in Manhattan, is running his third New York City Marathon and has his name printed on his chest this year.

“You are a participant in the biggest sporting event on the planet that day,” he said. “People screaming your name is one of the really cool aspects of it, especially when it’s people you’ve never seen in areas you’ve never been.”

Some runners personalize their attire themselves using markers, duct tape or iron-on letters. Others go to the professionals.

Gifted NYC, a T-shirt shop in Greenwich Village, has been printing names on marathon singlets for the past 15 years. Douglas John, one of its owners, says he prints about 500 each year. And at Paragon Sports, near Union Square, name pressing was free this year.

Calla Murphy, who organizes Paragon’s run club, said that spectators calling out your name “really gives you that momentum to take that next step forward.” She went with sparkly gold lettering when she ran the marathon last year.

The tradition is much easier for those with short first names, said Geoffrey Wohlgamuth, 40, who lives in Manhattan and has run the New York City Marathon twice. This year, he painstakingly traced each of the eight letters of his name on a sheet of paper to ensure that he could squeeze them all onto the fabric across his torso.

“I am pushing the upper limits of name length,” he said. “I’m nipple to nipple, to be blunt.”

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:58 p.m. ET

Amir Hamja

A woman holds a sign at 59th Street near Central Park telling the runners who runs the city (it’s not the rats).

Credit…Amir Hamja/The New York Times
Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:39 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

David Roeske, 42, finished his race and set a new personal record, then headed back to the course to cheer for other runners.

“There’s so much unity and love,” on marathon day, he said, calling it his favorite day of the year. “The whole city is celebrating. The whole city is community.”

Erin Nolan

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:38 p.m. ET

Erin Nolan

An enthusiastic crowd danced and waved signs as a playlist featuring Jay-Z, Thin Lizzy and U2 blared from speakers outside M. Wells, a restaurant on Crescent Street in Long Island City. Children wrestled with an inflatable leprechaun dancing next to the DJ.

The staff began coming to the restaurant to watch the marathon 10 years ago, said Sarah Obraitis, the owner, and what began as a casual gathering of coworkers has since evolved into a sort of block party for the entire neighborhood.

“More people started coming, and it’s become essential,” she said. “We pride ourselves in being this tiny stretch of the race, plus it’s the halfway point. We always try to make that mark even more special.”

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CreditCredit…Erin Nolan for The New York Times

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:32 p.m. ET
Runners on the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge at the start of last year’s New York City Marathon.

One woman said it was worse than childbirth. Several people had passed out, or laid out, near the Queensboro Bridge. And my heart was racing. I was in tears.

Last year’s New York City Marathon — the hottest in 51 years — was brutal. Everyone agreed that it felt as though New York was against us.

This year, temperatures on marathon Sunday are in the low 60s, ideal running conditions. If only we had been so lucky.

After training all summer, I was in peak form and ready for my second New York marathon. In the first half, I was hitting my target pace and flying by my friends and colleagues in Brooklyn.

But as I approached the Pulaski Bridge, I couldn’t bring my heart rate down and overheated. I slowly trotted the rest of the race, finishing about an hour over my predicted time. I was absolutely crushed.

Running the New York City Marathon is an ode to the city and the streets we know so well, a final performance that is the culmination of hours of training we hoped would pay off in the end.

My medal from last year’s marathon.

But disappointment fades. What remains are memories of what I love most about running this race in this city:

Laughing at the sanitation workers on the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge holding a sign cheekily saying, “Only 25.2 miles left!”

The children on Bedford Avenue in Brooklyn handing out Halloween candy to runners in need of a sugar boost.

The mother in Astoria, Queens, with an incredible sign that said, “My son runs from commitment and relationships so a marathon makes sense.”

My own friends made signs and followed me as I slowed down, and medics in Central Park gave me ice. It was a reminder that we are all in this together through those grueling grinding miles, putting one foot in front of the other in order to make it to the finish line.

I’m not running in the New York marathon on Sunday, but I will be at Mile 9 in Brooklyn, cheering everyone on as they make their own 26.2-mile journey through the city we love.

I’m rooting for the weather to stay perfect this year.


Staten Island & Start Line

Athletes wait to begin the race at Fort Wadsworth in Staten Island.
Runners on the Staten Island Ferry heading to Fort Wadsworth for the marathon.
Items left on the Verrazzano-Narrows Bridge behind the starting line, including water and ibuprofen.
Athletes from Wave 2 wait in the corrals to begin the race in Staten Island.

Brooklyn

A water stop in Williamsburg.
Children in Bay Ridge make signs as the race begins.
A man crosses Bedford Ave during the race.

Queens and the Bronx

A runner stretches before reaching the Queensboro Bridge.
Many runners slowed down as they approached the Bronx because of the high heat and humidity.

Manhattan & Finish Line

The final stretch! Runners enter Central Park for the final time and head toward the finish.
Runners receive medals after crossing the finish line in record high heat and humidity.
Runners stretch and recover shortly after crossing the finish line.
Runners head home after an exhausting race.
Scott Cacciola

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:30 p.m. ET

Scott Cacciola

Hellen Obiri’s teammates from OAC, which is her Boulder-based professional club, made the trip to cheer her on.

Credit…Kelsey Quinn
Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:28 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

Regulars at the race will notice a difference: This year the finisher ponchos are orange instead of blue.

Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:20 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

Robert Milam, 47, said he just knocked three minutes off his marathon time, finishing in 2:44.

“I don’t think there’s any other marathon like this,” he said. “The whole city comes out for this one.”

Credit…Jennie Coughlin for The New York Times

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:13 p.m. ET

Anna Watts

The all-female drum band Fogo Azul plays for runners as they come down 1st Avenue in Manhattan.

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CreditCredit…Anna Watts for The New York Times
Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:13 p.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

Four hours after the men’s wheelchair race started, the runners are finally coming through Columbus Circle in a steady stream as Wave 1 runners approach the finish.

Credit…Jennie Coughlin for The New York Times
Erin Nolan

Nov. 5, 2023, 12:12 p.m. ET

Erin Nolan

Apollo, a 2-year-old golden doodle, relaxed as his owners Leah and Ben Albainy clapped for runners as they headed toward the Ed Koch Queensboro Bridge.

The couple has watched the marathon every year for nearly a decade, they said.

“It’s just such a great moment for New York City,” Leah Albainy said. “I love that it’s for everyone. There are professional runners, older people, the people later in the day who walk the marathon. Anyone can do it.”

Credit…Erin Nolan for The New York Times
Nadav Gavrielov

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:59 a.m. ET
“I’m getting decrepit by the hour,” said Garth Barfoot, who trained for the New York City marathon by running back and forth from his retirement home to a coffee shop.Credit…Natalie Keyssar for The New York Times

Garth Barfoot’s training regimen has been fairly straightforward: daily runs to his favorite coffee shop and back home.

“It’s a decent distance from the retirement home,” Barfoot said.

The 87-year-old New Zealander, who lives in a suburb of Auckland, is the oldest participant at this year’s marathon. About 60 other registered runners are at least 80 years old, according to the New York Road Runners Club.

At just under 3 hours, he was nearing Mile 8 with an average pace of 22 minutes 27 seconds per mile.

This won’t be Barfoot’s first marathon — he says he has run dozens of others, including last year’s London Marathon, which he finished in 8 hours 17 minutes and 19 seconds — but it is his first New York marathon.

“I’m getting decrepit by the hour,” he said in an interview, noting a series of health issues, in recent years, including a heart valve transplant and three hip replacements. “So I’ve got to sort of hurry up and do this race before it’s too late.”

Barfoot didn’t really get into running until his 50s, inspired by his wife, Judy.

These days, though, she doesn’t always support his exercise regimen, he says.

“‘Must you run every day, Garth?’” Barfoot said his wife says, adding, “‘You don’t have to do that — this is a retirement home.’”

He’s the only marathoner who lives in his retirement home, but the routine lifestyle of living there makes training easy, he said.

His running group gets him in touch with younger people, and his runs help him spend time away from the home.

“The ambient noise of old people talking loudly to each other is so much,” Barfoot said.

He has, however, felt a lot of support from his retirement community ahead of the marathon.

“They sort of take a bit of pride in me,” Barfoot said. “I think they think I’m a good advertisement for retirement homes.”

He has one clear goal for Sunday’s race: “I’m looking forward to not falling over.”

Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:58 a.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

A group of 20 to 30 spectators wearing blue baseball caps and ringing blue cowbells along Central Park South turned out to be a joint Brooks and Fleet Feet cheer squad to support employees of both companies who are running today. Running clubs and crews are some of the most visible cheer groups along the course, but some companies organize meetups, too.

Credit…Jennie Coughlin for The New York Times
Claire Fahy

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:56 a.m. ET

Claire Fahy

A race volunteer used a rake to collect discarded water and Gatorade cups at an aid station on First Avenue. The cups used this year are made from bamboo and will be sent to a farm upstate to be composted.

Credit…Claire Fahy for The New York Times
Scott Cacciola

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:45 a.m. ET
Hellen Obiri finished in 2:27:23, breaking ahead of a pack of elite women.Credit…Uli Seit for The New York Times

Hellen Obiri of Kenya separated herself from a decorated women’s field on Sunday to win her first New York City Marathon, winning in 2:27:23.

It was a moment of redemption for Obiri, 33, who had labored to a sixth-place finish on the streets of New York last year in her marathon debut.

On Sunday, though, she exercised patience in the final miles — and even in the final meters, as she pumped her arms and lengthened her stride to break away from runner-up Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia, the world-record holder in the 10,000 meters and the half marathon.

Obiri, a two-time Olympic medalist in the 5,000 meters, continues to impress in the marathon. She won the Boston Marathon in April.

Claire Fahy

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:45 a.m. ET

Claire Fahy

The bartenders at Plug Uglies at 78th street and First Avenue have set up shop on the bar’s covered patio to better serve spectators. Cheering on the runners is thirsty work.

Credit…Claire Fahy for The New York Times
Nadav Gavrielov

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:39 a.m. ET
Yaniv Zaguri planned to run the marathon in a shirt reading “Never Forget,” with the date of the Hamas attack on Israel inscribed below.Credit…Natalie Keyssar for The New York Times

Yaniv Zaguri, an Israeli athlete, was so tired from a 22-mile run that was part of his training for the New York City Marathon that he decided to skip an early morning run with his club, the Sderot Front Runners, on Oct. 7.

The group of friends often ran through Be’eri, Re’im and other Israeli kibbutzim adjacent to the Gaza Strip. Of the three who went on the run that day, Zaguri said, two were killed in the terrorist attack carried out by Hamas.

“You could say that the New York marathon saved me,” he said in an interview.

The sole survivor, Ram Hayun, wrote in an account posted on an Israeli blog dedicated to running that he and the other two runners scrambled to hide when Hamas gunmen passed by — first behind a tree, then a concrete block and then under a protruding pipe. They covered themselves in leaves in an attempt to conceal their brightly colored running gear.

Israeli soldiers eventually reached them, Hayun wrote, but Hamas gunmen ambushed the group, killing the other two runners, Neomi Shitrit Azulai and Kobi Periente.

Two more members of the club were also killed that day, Zaguri said.

In the weeks after the attack, the group of Israelis he was originally supposed to run the marathon with canceled, too deep in mourning. Some had been called up to the military reserves.

But Zaguri decided that it was important for him to go through with the race.

“I felt that if I didn’t run,” he said, “then I would be surrendering to Hamas.”

On Saturday morning, Zaguri took part in “Run for Their Lives,” an organized run in Central Park in honor of the Israelis who Hamas took hostage.

He said he would be running the marathon in a shirt that says “Never Forget,” with the date of the attack inscribed below.

On Sunday, as the marathon got underway, a group gathered near Columbus Circle to raise awareness of the hostages. Hours later, as a marathoner wearing the Israeli flag like a cape ran by, they cheered him on.

“Bring them home!” the group chanted as the other runners passed.

Elsewhere along the route, other spectators, too, held posters with photographs of the hostages.

Shany Granot-Lubaton, a leader of the Hostages and Missing Families Forum in New York, noted that it had been four weeks since the hostages were abducted, and that she hoped the global stage the marathon provides would help bring attention to the cause.

“We just want everyone to understand that time is running out,” she said.

Jennie Coughlin contributed reporting.

Claire Fahy

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:37 a.m. ET

Claire Fahy

Many marathon runners write their names across their shirts or bibs, so that more people than just their friends and family can cheer for them. As the race picked up along First Avenue, there were choruses of “Looking good, Steve!” “Go, Ernesto!” and “Come on, Taylor!” from enthusiastic strangers.

Credit…Claire Fahy for The New York Times
Jennie Coughlin

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:36 a.m. ET

Jennie Coughlin

Emanuele Cesare, 39, and his husband cheer every year at the marathon, usually in the last mile or so of the race. Cesare was there to cheer for Molly Huddle, who had already come through, and three other people he expected to pass by soon. Despite reports of the runner tracking app crashing, he said it was working well for him.

Lola Fadulu

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:33 a.m. ET

Lola Fadulu

Marathons can be lucrative for the elite runners who win and the brands that sponsor them, but they can also be an important source of revenue for local elementary schools. P.S. 38 in Brooklyn set up a bake sale along the course. The school has had a marathon bake sale for the past three years, and it helps fund the fifth-grade graduation, said Leilana Marrero, the fifth grade committee chair.

Credit…Lola Fadulu for The New York Times
Erin Nolan

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:30 a.m. ET

Erin Nolan

Ricardo Arias, 64; his daughters Sofia, 27, and Monica, 39; and Monica’s wife Kelsey, 34, chatted as the runners passed by. A small dog named Chester lounged in a backpack strapped to Sofia’s back.

Having moved to various places across the country, the Arias family rarely gets to see each other, but watching Ricardo’s other daughter, Cristina Arias, run the New York marathon was the perfect excuse to come together.

“We haven’t all been together since Christmas,” said Sofia, who lives in Washington D.C. “And we’re just so excited for her.”

Credit…Erin Nolan for The New York Times
Claire Fahy

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:25 a.m. ET

Claire Fahy

Doron Eli, standing on First Avenue near 82nd street, holds a poster featuring the faces of two Israelis held hostage by Hamas.

Credit…Claire Fahy for The New York Times
Scott Cacciola

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:20 a.m. ET
Tamirat Tola finished in 2:04:58.Credit…Uli Seit for The New York Times

Tamirat Tola of Ethiopia left no doubt of his superiority among the men’s elite field on Sunday morning as he won his first New York City Marathon in a course record time of 2:04:58.

Tola, 32, who was the bronze medalist in the 10,000 meters at the 2016 Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, put that speed to use on a challenging course, breaking Geoffrey Mutai’s previous record of 2:05:06 from 2011.

Tola was the world champion in the men’s marathon in 2022 and finished third at the London Marathon in April. But he arrived in New York with some questions about his fitness after he dropped out of the marathon at the world championships in Budapest in August.

He quelled those concerns on Sunday as the lead pack thinned around him. By around Mile 20, he began to separate himself from the only other runner who remained in contention, his fellow countryman Jemal Yimer. Tola simply got faster as the race wore on.

Victor Mather

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:18 a.m. ET

Victor Mather

Behind Tamirat Tola on the men’s side were Albert Korir, Shura Kitata, Abdi Nageeye and Koen Naert.

Victor Mather

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:16 a.m. ET

Victor Mather

Behind Hellen Obiri in the women’s race were Letesenbet Gidey (five seconds back), Sharon Lokedi, Bridgid Kosgei and Mary Ngugi. All are Kenyan, except Gidey, an Ethiopian. The top American was Kellyn Taylor in eighth.

Victor Mather

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:09 a.m. ET

Victor Mather

Tamirat Tola of Ethiopia runs away with the men’s New York City Marathon in an unofficial time of 2:04:59.

Victor Mather

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:07 a.m. ET

Victor Mather

Hellen Obiri of Kenya outsprints Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia and wins the New York City Marathon in an unofficial time of 2:27:23.

Credit…Uli Seit for The New York Times
Victor Mather

Nov. 5, 2023, 11:06 a.m. ET

Victor Mather

Obiri and Gidey to the wire …

Ken Belson

Nov. 5, 2023, 10:45 a.m. ET
Credit…Uli Seit for The New York Times

Marcel Hug and Catherine Debrunner, both from Switzerland, won the men’s and women’s wheelchair races in the New York City Marathon on Sunday. Hug won a record sixth victory on New York’s course, while Debrunner set a course record in her debut in the race.

Hug, whose nickname is the Silver Bullet, won his third consecutive race in New York in 1 hour 25 minutes 29 seconds, three seconds short of the course record he set last year. He also surpassed Kurt Fearnley’s record of five wins in the race.

“It’s incredible,” Hug said on ESPN. “At the moment, I’m just so, so tired. It was really tough. But I’m happy as well.”

Debrunner ended a dominating 2023 by finishing in 1 hour 39 minutes 32 seconds, smashing the New York course record by more than three minutes.

Earlier this year, she won the Berlin and Chicago marathons, which are both on flat courses, compared to New York’s hilly course. She set course records in both races and a world record in Berlin.

She also won the title for most points in the major marathon series, which includes six races globally.

“I knew it was the toughest marathon and it was my first time,” Debrunner said on ESPN after the race. “I came away much earlier than expected and I did the whole race by myself. It means the world to me. I won the whole marathon series and that’s so insane. It’s been a fairy-tale season.”

Catherine Debrunner won the women’s wheelchair division, setting a new course record.Credit…Earl Wilson/The New York Times

Like last year, Hug was neck-and-neck with Daniel Romanchuk of the United States for the first few miles of the race. But as they sped through Brooklyn, Hug pulled away and was several minutes in front by the halfway point. His commanding lead held over the rest of the course.

While Romanchuk finished second in 1 hour 30 minutes 7 seconds on Sunday, he qualified for the U.S. team in next summer’s Paralympic Games in Paris. For the first time, the New York City Marathon doubled as the qualifying race for the top two American finishers. Aaron Pike, the second American finisher, also made the team.

Debrunner led almost from the start of the race on Staten Island. She had a commanding one-minute lead within the first 10 miles of the race. By the midway point, her lead had ballooned to more than three minutes over Susannah Scaroni of the United States, who won the race in record time last year.

Manuela Schar of Switzerland finished second. Scaroni finished third, but she qualified for the U.S. team for the Paralympic Games, as did Tatyana McFadden, a five-time winner of the race, who finished sixth.

Hug won $35,000 for finishing first in his division. Debrunner won $35,000 for winning her division and another $50,000 for breaking the course record.

Erin Nolan

Nov. 5, 2023, 10:29 a.m. ET
Last year’s winners on the podium.Credit…Justin Lane/EPA, via Shutterstock

Nearly $900,000 is guaranteed to be awarded to the top finishers in this year’s New York City Marathon, and additional prize money could be distributed if athletes break course records.

The first-place finishers of both the women’s and men’s open races — which feature only professional and invited athletes — will receive $100,000 each, while the fastest runners in the men’s and women’s American divisions will each win $25,000.

The winners of the women’s and men’s wheelchair races will receive $35,000 each — $10,000 more than was awarded last year.

A $5,000 prize will be awarded to the top nonbinary runner competing in the New York Road Runners member nonbinary division. Though there has been a nonbinary division since 2021, last year’s marathon was the first where cash prizes were awarded to nonbinary athletes. Some criticized the fact that the prize package was much smaller than those awarded to the other winners.

Athletes who break existing course records could win an additional $50,000, but the bonus money is only available to first-place finishers, and they must break — not tie — current records.

Smaller prize packages will also be awarded to top racers who do not finish first.

Lola Fadulu

Nov. 5, 2023, 10:18 a.m. ET
Sharon Lokedi of Kenya crosses the finish line at the 2022 New York City Marathon.Credit…Ben Solomon for The New York Times

The winner of last year’s elite women’s division, Sharon Lokedi of Kenya, is looking forward to seeing the thousands of fans who will be out cheering on Sunday. But there is one spectator in particular who she is most excited to see: her mother.

This year’s marathon, Lokedi said, will mark the first time that her mother, Rose, will be able to see her compete in a professional race. Lokedi has largely competed in the United States and in Europe, and her mother lives in Kenya. But this year, her mother was invited to attend the race and received a visa

Lokedi was largely unknown in the elite distance running world before she won last year’s marathon in 2 hours, 23 minutes and 23 seconds. Even as she crossed the finish line, she kept asking herself: “Is it really me?” She said it took her months to process that she had won.

It’s hard to overstate, Lokedi said, what the win and support from runners around the world have meant to her. “It’s given me strength and confidence that I didn’t think I would have,” she said.

Lokedi competed for the University of Kansas, where she finished 10th in the N.C.A.A. women’s cross-country championship in 2015 and fifth in 2016.

Before last year’s New York City Marathon win, she finished fourth in the New York City Half Marathon and second in the New York Mini 10k.

Lokedi is competing on Sunday after coming back from an injury this spring that affected her ankle rotation. She said that during her training she focused on paying attention to how her body felt.

“I just couldn’t run and I think it was overuse,” Ms. Lokedi said. “It’s been good just coming back slowly.”

When asked by reporters what her expectations were for this year’s race, and whether she planned to win again, she was modest.

“For me, it’s just like, get out there,” she said. “Put yourself in it and don’t put too much pressure on yourself and don’t worry about what happens after.”

Ken Belson

Nov. 5, 2023, 10:01 a.m. ET
Catherine Debrunner led from the start of the race on Sunday.Credit…Rosem Morton for The New York Times

Catherine Debrunner of Switzerland easily won her first New York City Marathon wheelchair race in a time of 1:39:32, a course record.

Debrunner led from the start of the race in Staten Island and built a commanding one-minute lead by the 10-mile mark. By the midway point, her lead had ballooned to more than three minutes over Susannah Scaroni of the United States, who set the course record last year with a 1:42:43 finish.

Debrunner also won the Berlin and Chicago marathons this year, which are both on flat courses, compared to New York’s hilly course.

Debrunner won $35,000 for winning her division and another $50,000 for breaking the course record.

Manuela Schar of Switzerland finished second on Sunday.

While Scaroni finished third, she qualified for the U.S. Paralympic team for the 2024 Paralympic Games in Paris next summer. For the first time, the New York City Marathon doubled as the qualifying race for the top two American finishers.

Tatyana McFadden, a five-time winner of the race, finished sixth and also qualified for the U.S. Paralympic team.

Ken Belson

Nov. 5, 2023, 9:35 a.m. ET
Credit…Uli Seit for The New York Times

Marcel Hug of Switzerland won his record sixth New York City wheelchair marathon in an unofficial time of 1:25:29, three seconds short of the course record he set last year.

It was Hug’s third consecutive win in New York. He also surpassed Kurt Fearnley’s previous record of five wins in the race.

Like last year, Hug was neck-and-neck with Daniel Romanchuk of the United States for the first few miles of the race.

But as they sped through Brooklyn, Hug pulled away, gradually building up a lead that held over the entire course.

By halfway through the race, Hug, whose nickname is the Silver Bullet, was several minutes in front.

While Romanchuk finished second on Sunday, he qualified for the U.S. team in next summer’s Paralympic Games in Paris. For the first time, the New York City Marathon doubled as the qualifying race for the top two American finishers.

Aaron Pike, the second American finisher, also made the team.

Hug won $35,000 for finishing first.

Claire Fahy

Nov. 5, 2023, 9:18 a.m. ET
Sheinelle Jones is a correspondent for NBC’s “Today Show.”Credit…Cj Rivera/Invision, via Associated Press

The celebrities registered to run in this year’s marathon may not all be A-listers, but that doesn’t stop everyone else from comparing their times.

Last year, Ashton Kutcher ran the marathon in 3 hours 54 minutes, and Chelsea Clinton ran it in 4:20.

This year, the New York Road Runners Club announced 16 celebrities registered among the 50,000 elites and normies set to crank out 26.2 miles on Sunday. Many are running for a charity.

Sheinelle Jones, a correspondent for NBC’s “Today” show, is running her first marathon to mark her 45th birthday. She will be joined on the course by the former “Good Morning America” correspondents Amy Robach and T.J. Holmes.

There will also be a number of sports stars along the route. Zdeno Chara, a Stanley Cup champion and former Boston Bruins defenseman, is running his first New York marathon. Steve Mesler, an American bobsledder and Olympic gold medalist, had never run farther than five miles before April.

Patina Miller, who starred on “Madam Secretary” on CBS, is running her second marathon and also singing the national anthem at the start line.

Another T.V. star, Luke Macfarlane, of “Brothers & Sisters,” is running with his partner and sister-and-law.

And as has been the case for a number of years, the race will feature cast members from ABC’s “Bachelor”and “Bachelorette” reality television franchises. Matt James, Zac Clark and Joe Amabile have all signed up to run. Nev Shulman, host of MTV’s “Catfish,” will be running as a guide for Francesco Magisano, who is blind.

Here’s how you can track your favorite runners in real-time on the TCS New York City Marathon app using their name or bib number.

And you can look up results here.

Nov. 5, 2023, 9:08 a.m. ET

The New York Times

Scott Cacciola

Nov. 5, 2023, 8:27 a.m. ET
Hellen Obiri won Boston Marathon in April.Credit…Ian MacLellan for The New York Times

Tackling a marathon for the first time, especially one as daunting as the New York City Marathon, is no easy task, even for some of the best runners on the planet.

Consider the experience of Hellen Obiri, a two-time Olympic medalist for Kenya in the 5,000 meters who made her marathon debut in New York last year. She went out strong but was under-fueled and impatient, and wound up laboring to a sixth-place finish, over two minutes behind the surprise winner, her countrywoman, Sharon Lokedi.

Obiri, 33, learned her lesson. She went on to win the Boston Marathon in April, and she has returned in New York this morning as one of the favorites in a deep women’s field.

Lokedi, who struggled with a foot injury earlier this year and was forced to withdraw from Boston, will try to defend her title. But she is expected to be tested by Obiri and several others, including Letesenbet Gidey of Ethiopia, the world-record holder in the 10,000 meters and the half marathon, and Brigid Kosgei of Kenya, an Olympic silver medalist and a five-time world marathon major champion.

Peres Jepchirchir, the reigning Olympic champion, announced on Saturday that she would not be able to compete today after she sustained a lower leg injury in her final workout ahead of the race.

Many American runners are skipping New York so that they can continue to prepare for the U.S. Olympic marathon trials, which are scheduled for February in Orlando, Fla. But keep an eye on two new moms in the field: Molly Huddle, 39, a two-time Olympian and former American record-holder in the 5,000 meters, 10,000 meters and half marathon; and Kellyn Taylor, 37, who placed sixth in New York in 2021.

The men’s field lacks some of the pizazz of the women’s field. Evans Chebet, who won the race last year, and Geoffrey Kamworor, a two-time champion, both withdrew from the race last month.

The field, though, still includes Tamirat Tola of Ethiopia, a 2:03:39 marathoner who was the world champion in 2022; his countryman Shura Kitata, the 2020 London Marathon champion and a two-time runner-up in New York; and Albert Korir of Kenya, who won here in 2021.

Cameron Levins, a Canadian who runs an absurd amount of miles in training, figures to be among the contenders, too. His fifth-place finish at the Tokyo Marathon in March in 2:05:36 made him the fastest North American marathoner in history. And Edward Cheserek of Kenya is set to make his much-anticipated marathon debut. Cheserek was a decorated star at the University of Oregon.

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